Lease Analyst Position Offer?
orton1227
2:16p, 08/08/11
orton1227
18 posts, joined 04/14/2011
Got an offer for a Lease Analyst position at a large oil/gas company. I don't know much about the position and didn't get much info from the interview.

Can anybody give a decent day-to-day description of what a lease analyst does? What can I expect salary-wise?
WestTexAG
3:04p, 08/08/11
WestTexAG
2502 posts, joined 09/27/2004
Salary wasn't in the offer?
orton1227
3:11p, 08/08/11
orton1227
18 posts, joined 04/14/2011
I was told to tell them what I expect. Pretty typical, surprisingly. I've been on a ton of interviews and was always asked the same question.
rebel06
3:50p, 08/08/11
rebel06
1739 posts, joined 08/02/2007
Here's a description of what the lease analysts do at our company. I'm actually a landman but hopefully this will be helpful:

quote:
•Analysis, set up and update for leases, contracts, agreements, rights-of-ways, farmouts/farmins, joint operating agreements and other land documents. Review ownership data and title. Obtains necessary information for lease and contract set up in land system.

•Monitors lease and contract obligations and works with the Landman and Senior Lease Analysts to obtain proper authorization for payment and/or action.

•Update land system to reflect on going assignments or conveyances. Maintain leases and contracts with changes in lease status.

•Works closely with GIS Analyst to review, document and resolve tract issues.

•Works closely with Division Order and Landman counterpart on identifying leases and contracts in wells and units. Also works closely with other Analyst and/or Landman on title issues. May assist in preparing necessary documents to perfect title

•Continue to research, analyze and maintain leases, lands and contracts to ensure consistent reporting data and accurate maps.

• Assists senior analysts, supervisor and manager with special projects as needed. Handles moderately complex projects.

•Maintains professional and technical knowledge by attending educational workshops, reviewing professional publications, and establishing personal networks.


As far as salary, if it's entry level, I would guess it is somewhere around $35-40K.

[This message has been edited by rebel06 (edited 8/8/2011 3:50p).]
orton1227
3:59p, 08/08/11
orton1227
18 posts, joined 04/14/2011
okay, thanks.

i've been a landman for 6 years, but our office is shutting down, so i'm looking at all the options to stay in DFW. But it appears that a better career decision is to take another landman position out of state.
rebel06
4:30p, 08/08/11
rebel06
1739 posts, joined 08/02/2007
You might want to subscribe to this email distribution that has various landman jobs. A large portion of them are field jobs but it might be helpful:

http://visitor.constantcontact.com/manage/optin/ea?v=001JhAH0M7VcWcV54clhLqI8g%3D%3D
orton1227
5:14p, 08/08/11
orton1227
18 posts, joined 04/14/2011
Appreciate the link.

Apparently the job I was offered is a Sr. Division Order Analyst position. So I gather that's different than a Lease Analyst.

I'm a little nervous to have been offered a "senior" position. I feel like I should have known exactly what it was to be considered for it.
rebel06
9:03a, 08/09/11
rebel06
1739 posts, joined 08/02/2007
Being a division order analyst isn't a terrible job. You can actually make pretty good money. Here's a description of that role within our company:

quote:
-Assist all revenue interest owners and Lessors in various matters and responds to their inquiries. Analyzes documentation of ownership changes of interest, prepares and issues transfer division orders when needed, and updates the Land Division Order and/or revenue records.
-Assists in preparing and processing more complex Transfer Orders and Division Orders and in satisfying requirements and preparing and obtaining curative documents related to Division Order Title Opinions.
-Assists in Acquisition and Divestiture activities as required to and in preparing and processing Letters in lieu.
-Assists supervisor and other land management with special projects when needed.
-Prepares information to update lease records and DOI’s ensuring timely reporting to accounting functions.
-Works closely with Lease Records, Landmen and senior land department staff to obtain support documentation and review title.
-Assumes additional responsibilities and performs special projects as needed or directed
-Maintains professional and technical knowledge by attending educational workshops, reviewing professional publications, and establishing personal networks.
-Prepares well setups and provides detailed research.
-Performs other related duties and special projects as required.
TruencyAg
10:03a, 08/09/11
TruencyAg
210 posts, joined 10/06/2010
Your a field landman I assume since you don't know what a DOA or LA is...here is my advice from a tenured colleague

If you want to be a landman and pursue the profession, you prob won't like the above positions and it definitely won't help you progress as a landman.

Now if you are trying to get out of the field an don't care about the progression, it could be a good stable job for years to come. Just an FYI, at the mid to small level companies the landmen are the supervisors Of these positions

I wouldn't take the job since you dont even know what it is.

I find it odd they offered you a job that you obviously have no clue about. Would you offer someone a job if you knew they didn't even know what I was.

Progress with caution my friend....
rebel06
12:17p, 08/09/11
rebel06
1739 posts, joined 08/02/2007
I agree with TruencyAg in that taking a division order analyst job will probably not allow you to transition into a landman position. If there is a land technician position available, that's much closer to what a landman does and some companies even hire land tech's with the plan to move them into a landman position after a period of time.

I was trying to give you an idea on what you would be doing with those two positions (division order analyst and lease analyst). If you are really wanting to stay in the DFW area and simply can't find a landman job, then being a division order analyst isn't a terrible option and something you can learn pretty quickly. However, if you enjoy land work I would suggest finding work outside of the DFW area if you are in a position to move to another city or state.
orton1227
2:56p, 08/09/11
orton1227
18 posts, joined 04/14/2011
Thanks for the advice everyone.

I'd love to stay in DFW, though if there were attractive offers in beautiful places, I'd consider it. Ohio is not beautiful, but that's where most of the out of state offers are coming from. Living in Texas all my life, I wouldn't mind moving to a place that you might see on a calendar.

I've been a field landman in DFW for the past 6 years and love it. It suits everything about my personality...except the leasing part, which I have no experience in because my boss realized that I was a gifted researcher, but not talker. So I'm a little scared to move into another company as a landman and have to do some leasing seeing as I have no experience. But maybe that's what's best.

Appreciate the advice!
Aggie Oilman
8:56a, 08/11/11
Aggie Oilman
427 posts, joined 08/19/2008
A lot of misinformation in this thread. As far as salary goes an entry level DOA is around 50k. For a senior position it should start around 80k. Also, as far as landmen being your bosses, I am a DOA and have never had a landman as a boss in all my years working. It is also easy to go from this job to a landman position inhouse or field. I have known several DOAs that go back and forth from landman to DOA. Normally being a landman is what you do whn oil is good and you fall back on DOA when oil is bad since DOAs are always the last positions that are cut. Hope this helps.
Mhickerson09
4:17p, 08/23/11
Mhickerson09
266 posts, joined 08/17/2011
I'm currently an Appraiser for a Central Appraisal Office that appraises values for taxation and have recently been thinking about a career change. Can you enlighten me on being a landman. I don't know a whole lot about what they do but they seem to do well.
orton1227
1:14p, 08/24/11
orton1227
18 posts, joined 04/14/2011
Mhickerson, basically a landman creates ownership histories for a specific piece of land all the way back to when the State patented the land to whomever. We grab documents from the courthouse that's applicable to the land and organize them in Excel or something similar. Then we present the findings to an attorney who's working for the client (an oil&gas company).
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